Power Transmission Tag

Drill rig chains work in some of the toughest environments. They’re also essential to a drilling rig assembly. As CBCAustralia’s National Product Manager for Power Transmission, Troy Markland, explains, “once a drilling operation starts, you can’t afford a chain to break halfway through the process.” This...

Ever since Melbourne-based construction and demolition material recycler, City Circle Group, were introduced by their CBC sales manager to the high-performance Gates® belts a few years ago, there’s been no looking back for them, according to City Circle Group’s Recycling Operations Manager Josh Ralston. Recycling construction...

The explosive nature of grain and flour dusts is well-documented, with some of the worst industrial accidents in the world caused by explosions from dust clouds. Research published in the United States additionally reveals that 50% of all explosions from combustible dusts in the 20th...

The Australian cattle dog has become iconic in the Australian agricultural landscape because of their unique attributes. Energetic, hardworking, and intelligent, the dogs, bred originally from a combination of English drovers’ dogs and dingoes, are tough enough to work for hours in harsh Australian conditions.

Rotating Bearings tend to be the ‘star’ components of production machinery, with the importance of their role discussed often. However, industry expert John Tawadros points out that linear bearing guidance systems are just as essential, particularly in production environments where high dynamic loads and contamination can impact production efficiency.

It’s a little-known fact that the humble roller chain, a critical component to recycling plants, was first conceived by Leonardo da Vinci in the 1500s. However it wasn’t until 1880 that the roller chain was actually invented and the Indianapolis Chain and Stamping Company was founded in 1890. The first US domestic roller chain producer was focused on a chain for the safety bicycle.

When it comes to paper and cardboard recycling, Australia is relatively well-positioned globally. The National Waste Report 2018 shows that about 60 per cent of Australia’s paper and cardboard waste is recycled1, with other estimates putting the figure as high as 87 per cent 2. All paper or cardboard recycling processes often begin by shredding the raw material in an industrial shredder – also known as a mulcher – before moving on to pulping, de-inking, drying and rolling of new paper.